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Talismans and Amulets

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St. Benedict Medallion Back Talismans and Amulets

Not like I haven’t written about this before, the St. Benedict medallion I carry —

Or good luck charms —

The idea, I was looking at an issue on the web, and I noticed an outfit that sold similar types of amulets, used to attract money, love, power, or offering protection, with a price point $39 (and up). Similar, if not identical, merchandise is available, locally, in Market Square — see Grinning Skulls — mostly as local imports from Mexico. Have to be cautious, as some of the “handcrafted” material is now from other places like Taiwan and Thailand, but that’s not the case with this idea. Most recently, I happened across some handmade — Jalisco — silver trinkets, individually folded silver roses. Tiniest ones were about $20. Room to barter, but I wasn’t in the mood, and the symbolism of the rose itself, at least it wasn’t overtly “religious.”

St. Benedict Medallion FrontWhat I wanted was an inexpensive trinket, amulet, talisman type of artifact that I could bless and resell.

Some years back, I bought a dozen of the most inexpensive St. Benedict medals I happened across, impressed with the symbolism and potential meaning ascribed to each medallion. While it isn’t supposed to be used by a non-Catholic person to administer an exorcism, it’s still loaded with protection, and some of the symbols owe origins in more esoteric systems that clearly predate current Christian times and terms.

The other symbol that always worked for me was St. Christopher, and as I understand it, he got kicked out of the gang, which makes him more appealing, as I heard it, lore, more mythology, St. Christopher is — was — the patron saint of travelers and surfers. Living where I do, the traditions, an amalgam mostly Spanish culture that conquered this part of the world, with a sprinkling of other Northern European ideals scattered in.

As a practical pagan, the symbolism is important to me, and that medallion’s works on several levels. While it doesn’t attract money, it does serve as a powerful ward to keep away bad things. Happy coincidence, it is the medallion used in exorcisms. That’s some strong magic.

One of the “Golden Rules” from — alleged — Pythagoras?

“First worship the old gods as custom decrees.”(cf.,, Pink Cake for a citation.)

Images are from one I found for sale on Amazon. While I could wholesale them and then retail-up the price, adding my own, powerful blessing, I just can’t do that with a good conscience. Instead, just an Amazon link.

The symbols, the symbolism, the art, and a cheap Amazon Prime price? I’m still looking for a token amulet or talisman to sell online, and so far, these are the best. Unofficially blessed by me.

3pc St. Benedict Exorcism Medal. Our Silver Oxidized Saints Medals Come on a Convenient Jump Ring, Ready for a Stainless Steel Chain. — Oxidized Silver — 3/4″ H. Lay Catholics Are Not Permitted to Perform Exorcisms but They Can Use the Saint Benedict Medal, Holy Water, the Crucifix, and Other Sacramentals to Ward Off Evil. Catholic Saint Benedict Patron Saint of Kidney Disease, Poison Sufferers, Students, Poisoning, School Children, Homeless, Monks.
Returning from Austin, one evening, a car zipped past me on freeway, festooned with stickers. One caught my eye and made me grin, it was a question and answer:

    “Feel guilty even if you didn’t do it? You’re Catholic.”

I would amend the statement, but in a transparent mood, I just replicated the sticker. There were several other stickers, alluding to “Old Time” religion, and my pentacle, but that one sticker’s message is the one that stuck with me.

Military stickers, too. The driver was probably a pagan in the Armed Services. The guilt from the top down? Doesn’t work for me, and that residual “Catholic Guilt bias ™,” is problematic with this saint’s medallion. Still, as a collection of scared, esoteric symbols for protection, it works.

One half of that medallion is safe from Catholic/Christian persecution. No added-value guilt, i.e., guilt-free. Guiltless guile.

The Pink Cake Book

pinkcake cover
Pink Cake iBook
Pink CakeKindle

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